Exterior>

St. Silas the Martyr was designed by Ernest Shearman in a Mediterranean Gothic Style and built between 1911 - 1913 by the building contractors, Messrs. James Burges and Sons, Wimbledon.

South elevation & south porch
South elevation & south porch
The main entrance is on the south side of the church and access is from St. Silas Place, a cul-de-sac off Prince of Wales Road. Approaching from this direction, one gets an overall picture of the church. One is immediately aware of the eastern apse, the high pitched roof and lack of spire or tower and also the narrow lancet clerestory windows which are all typical of the style of Shearman. Also from this perspective the vestigial transepts are apparent. Below this is the double porch that was built onto the south transept. It is also obvious that this is mainly a brick building with a minimum of stone facings. As one approaches this entrance one can see to the right that there is a semi-circular window. Standing immediately to the right of the entrance there is a stone Calvary. The corbels on either side of the porch are busts of St. George on the right and St. Joan of Arc on the left. The standing statue to the left of the porch is the centurion who watched at the foot of the cross.
S. Joan of Arc
S. Joan of Arc
S. George
S. George
The Centurian
The Centurian
South porch & Calvary
South porch & Calvary
Pass the simple buttressed wall which is the chapel of St. Francis, that was added in 1913, to the west end of the church. If viewed from the steps of the surrounding flats this gives an impressive presence to the area, with its massive stone cross set into the upper part of the wall. On either side there are small lancet windows as if to symbolise the BVM and St. John waiting at the foot of the cross. Above the cross and just under the eaves is the Sanctus Bell.
South west elevation
South west elevation
North elevation
North elevation
Following round the west end of the church one comes to the north-west entrance, which is a pair of double doors under a simple lintel. Surrounding this porch are no less than six niches for statues, which unfortunately have never been added. At the east end of the north wall one finds that the church adjoins the old Mission Church (now the church hall).
North porch with six niches
North porch with six niches
North east elevation
North east elevation
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Royal Visit - Feb 2012 May Devotions 2012 Corpus Christi 2012 Solemn Vespers 2012 S. Silas Day 2012
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Society of Mary Church History Vintage Pictures Exterior Chancel & Sanctuary
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The Music & the Organs Organists Christmas Card 2016 Past Events Epiphany 2003
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Pictures Nina Somerset Benjamin C. Boulter Mystery Plays The Rosary
Organisations Who is Saint Silas? S. Silas, Apostle Priests of S. Silas Latin Inscriptions
Monthly Papers 100 Years Ago Ernest C. Shearman Shearman Churches Shearman Biography
Hymns to S. Silas S. Silas Day Flowers Banners War Memorial Benefactors
Recordings at S. Silas Holy Trinity Holy T. Sunday School South Camden Deanery Charles Williams
TS Eliot Illustrated Souvenir Link Churches Friends of S. Silas St Silas - Blackburn
S. Silas - Gembrook St Silas - Byker S. Silas - Albert Park S. Silas Balwyn North St Silas, Redwood, NZ
Novena to St. Silas Museo Guinigi, Lucca Elmhurst Ballet School St Silas Icons Camden's Lost Churches
20 years @ S Silas Talking to God Images of S Silas London Churches
Saint Silas Church, Kentish Town, London, NW5.